URCall: Blue Star-adjacent

From the ICR’s URCall series of videos, hosted by Markus Lloyd. “Blue Stars” (link)

Transcript:

Blue stars burn so brightly that they consume their fuel much faster than other stars. The hottest blue stars last only a few million years, and no astronomer has ever observed a new blue star forming. So, if astronomers are still seeing blue stars – which should have burned out a long time ago – how can the universe be billions of years old?

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A New Oldest Galaxy: z8_GND_5296

Keck TelescopesWe have a new contender for the title of “oldest known galaxy”: it has a redshift of z = 7.51, corresponding to an age only 700 million years younger than the universe as a whole, and has been assigned the code z8_GND_5296. Discoveries like this happen fairly often, as there is a sustained effort of astronomers staring at little red dots with similarly arcane designations in the hope of teasing out a little more information about the early evolution of galaxies. Continue reading

The So-Called Oort Cloud

Pillars of Creation, Eagle nebularIt’s been the better part of a month since we last ventured into space on this blog, but only two days since we saw some classic denialism. Today, we get both! Brian Thomas’ Wednesday article is called Certain Stellar Features Just Don’t Exist. Can you guess which he is talking about?

Sorting fact from fiction when it comes to outer space can be tricky, especially when scientists assert that certain stellar features are real when they are not. Why should school textbook authors, or the students and teachers that rely on them to deliver accurate information, trust these scientists’ more speculative assertions when they routinely name structures that don’t exist?

Creationists, of course, never engage in outrageous speculation. Continue reading

Blue Supergiants

Alnilam (Epsilon Orionis), lighting up NGC 1990As I said yesterday, in Blue Stars Confirm Recent Creation Jason Lisle outright denies the possibility of stellar formation. But he takes his time getting there.

Orion is one of the most well-known and easily recognized constellations of the winter sky. The three bright blue stars in Orion’s belt seem to draw our attention instantly. Such stars are a strong confirmation of the biblical timescale.

As is so often the case, Lisle’s idea of “confirmation of the biblical timescale” – strong confirmation – is just something that (he claims) the, ah, more commonly accepted timescales cannot explain. That’s all he has, really. All any creationist has. Continue reading