1066 and All That

It’s not often that I talk about (comparatively recent) history on this blog. The struggles of kings have little direct relevance to the age of the Earth, after all, or the origin of species. But that isn’t about to stop the intrepid James J. S. Johnson, whose December article is called Christmas, Vikings, and the Providence of God. He asks:

How are two famous Viking battles in 1066 related to the very first Christmas?

The battles in question are, of course, Stamford Bridge and Hastings – the latter of which only involves Vikings if you decide to define the Normans as being “still Vikings,” in true creationist style. It may take a while to get to the purported answer to the above question, but as a clue it has something to do with the following four people (click for more information):

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Countdown to Extinction

There are only a handful of articles left in the November 2012 edition of Acts & Facts that are worth close inspection. One of these, oddly enough, is by the prolific Brian Thomas. Most of Thomas’ Acts & Facts articles seem to be repeats of stuff that we have already covered, but his November article – Human Mutation Clock Confirms Creation – is a rare exception in that it seems to be largely new. Continue reading

James the Just

"The James ossuary was on display at the Royal Ontario Museum from November 15, 2002 to January 5, 2003." -- as the liscencing condition for this image demands that I tell you.Thomas writes: ‘James…Brother of Jesus’ Ossuary Is Rock Solid. What’s the cause of this horrible punnery?

Thomas’ intro is accurate until his final sentence:

In 2002, the Biblical Archaeological Society and the Discovery Channel announced in Washington, D.C. that an ancient inscription on a 2,000-year-old ossuary with the inscribed Aramaic words “James, son of Joseph, brother of Jesus” was genuine. However, controversy and a lawsuit over the veracity of the inscription followed. That’s all over now, and the verdicts are in.

Well, sort of. Continue reading