Ark Fight!

An (English) CoracleSo you remember that “round ark” story from a few weeks ago, right? Brian Thomas has finally gotten around to poo-pooing it with an article called “Cuneiform Reed-Ark Story Doesn’t Float.” He begins:

News emerged in 2010 that Irving Finkel, a cuneiform expert at the British Museum, had translated an ancient tablet describing Noah’s Ark as round and built of reeds. Now, Finkel is publishing a book on the find, and news reports again assert the tired tale that the Bible’s authors borrowed a Babylonian flood tale like the one on this tablet and modified it into their “story” of Noah. Babylonian or biblical, round or rectangular—which Ark story stays afloat?

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Henry Morris (1918-2006)

Monday (February 25) was the 7th anniversary of the death of Henry Morris, the founder of both the ICR and the modern creationist movement in general. To commemorate the date of “our founder’s passing into glory” Your Origins Matter posted an article, which included some quotes: Continue reading

Acts & Facts – December 2012

The December edition of Acts & Facts was actually a little less Christmas-y than I expected. This was not a very difficult accomplishment, however: if you have already had enough of the season then I suggest you stop reading, as I have already looked at most of the non-Christmas articles and there wont be much else that’s new.

Because it’s still December as I write this, the usual page on the ICR’s website is still current. There’s also a pdf of the magazine here, and all of the relevant links are below. Continue reading

Acts & Facts – November 2012

I think that will do for this month’s edition. It’s already well into December so the usual ICR Acts & Facts page has switched to the next month, but a pdf can be found here and the links are all below anyway. I haven’t already written as much on these articles as I have in past months, so there’s a fair bit here that you haven’t seen before (or at least recently). Note also that November was also the month of the US holiday of ‘Thanksgiving,’ something which I ignored entirely, so expect a lot of articles on that. Continue reading

Acts & Facts – October 2012

It is less than a week into the month of October and we have already reached the end of the articles worth analysing in any depth in the latest edition of Acts & Facts. It’s time then to take a look at all of the articles in context. For future reference the pdf of this months newsletter is located here.


Page 3: The Enduring Value of Words (Jayme Durant)

The gist of the editor’s column this month, after you get past the story about her great grandmother going into a retirement home, is that the ICR plans to release two new books this season. One is by Brad Forlow, and will be called Biology and the Bible – my guess is that this will most likely be pamphlet sized, and even that will be pushing it. The other is by John Morris, called The Global Flood: Unlocking Earth’s Geologic History. While most likely just have more of the same kind of stuff found in other young Earth creationist geology-related books, as I haven’t read any of those before it might be interesting to get my hands on. I still need to do Tomkins’ book, however, so it would have to be added to the end of an ever-lengthening queue.

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Acts & Facts – July 2012

July is an important month for Americans. It celebrates the date on which that nation’s Founding Fathers had the prescience to ensure that, on the day 236 years later that the discovery of the Higgs Boson was announced (more or less), there would be the necessary pretext for extravagant fireworks displays across the continent.

Like many creationists, the ICR felt the need to hitch up to that Bandwagon of Wisdom and try to claim that their founding fathers believed what they do now, as if it were Franklin’s fault he lived all those decades before Darwin. That, then, was the primary message of this months Acts & Facts, the Institute for Creation Research’s monthly satirical newsletter. A pdf of this edition is avaliable on their website at this link, while links to the articles were available here until a few hours ago but are also given below. Continue reading

The ICR’s Acts and ‘Facts’ – June 2012

The Institute for Creation Research has a number of magazines, the most famous of which is the monthly newsletter Acts & Facts, which is often featured on the ICR’s front page. Here’s a brief summary of the June 2012 edition. For future reference the magazine can be found in pdf form here.


The editor’s column for this month is by Jayme Durant, Associate Editor (and the author of last months). This months edition of Acts & Facts is all about repeatedly insisting that “Genesis matters.” They have, in reverse alphabetical order, “Why Recent Creation Matters,” this “What Matters Most” article, “Does Genesis Really Matter,” and “Do Origins Matter?” They also advertise for a ‘conference’ called “Your Origins Matter,” ads for which were present last month also. A little monotonous, but whatever. Continue reading

The ICR’s Acts and ‘Facts’ – May 2012

The Institute for Creation Research has a number of magazines, the most famous of which is the monthly newsletter Acts & Facts, which is often featured on the ICR’s front page. Here’s a brief summary of this month’s edition.

At present, the May edition is on their Acts and Facts homepage. For future reference this edition can be found in pdf form here.


It’s been a while, I know. I haven’t gotten around to tackling the ICR’s newsletter for some months now. A half-finished draft of a post on the January edition sits reproachfully on my wordpress dashboard, untouched since New Year’s Eve. I plan to finish it someday, but for now here’s May’s edition, in a slightly different format – I’m back to fiddling with multiple pages to try to make these behemoths a little more manageable. Click the links below, or go through page-by-page using the numbers at the bottom of each page.

…or you could just click here to begin, I suppose. Don’t forget to tell me if I mucked up any formatting, or should have done something differently.