Field Trip to the Museum

The Solar System Tour at the Perot Museum of Nature and ScienceThere’s a new museum in Dallas: the Perot Museum of Nature and Science. Technically it’s the building that’s new, and like many museums these days its architecture (which resembles a sedimentary outcrop) has apparently been controversial. But according to Evolutionary Eye Candy in New Dallas Museum, that isn’t what the ICR doesn’t like about it. Brain Thomas writes:

ICR employees visited the new Perot Museum of Nature and Science in downtown Dallas in late 2012. The big block-shaped building that The Dallas Morning News called “brash and breathtaking” had been under construction for several years. Its promoters advertised it as a place where visitors could receive strong doses of much-needed evolutionary teaching.

I haven’t seen any of this advertising – Mr Thomas does not link to it – but I am quite sure that, at very least, this was not how it was phrased. Continue reading

The Creation & Earth History Museum

The Museum of Creation and Earth History, in 2005Answers in Genesis have a Creation Museum – indeed, they’re famous for it. The ICR used to have one of their very own, but they sold it in 2008. In a thinly-disguised advertisement for the still-in-operation museum, an article in the latest edition of Acts & Facts catches up with how things are going back in Santee, California.

The Institute for Creation Research launched the Creation & Earth History Museum in Santee, California, in 1992. For 16 years, ICR developed and grew the exhibits with a mission to equip believers with evidence of the Bible’s accuracy and authority through scientific research, educational programs, and media presentations, all conducted within a thoroughly biblical framework. When ICR moved to Texas in 2008, the entire museum and its contents were sold to Scantibodies Laboratory, Inc.

The museum is now being run by Tom Cantor, who owns the Scantibodies company. He has made a few changes, which the article advertises. These include the “new 2,400-square-foot Human Anatomy Exhibit”; the “Tabernacle Theatre”; and the “Age of the Earth Mineral Cave.” Continue reading