Available Energy Decreases Over Time

Another quick one. The reason? I almost agree with it.

This is the part that I agree with, more or less:

There is less available energy today then there was yesterday.

The Second Law of Thermodynamics states that the entropy of an isolated system, such as the universe, that is not in equilibrium will tend to increase over time, approaching a maximum value at equilibrium. The Third Law of Thermodynamics states that as the temperature approaches absolute zero, the entropy of a system approaches a constant.

Fortunately for us, the temperature of the universe is not zero. It is moving that way each moment, but it is not there yet.

At some prior time, all the energy in the universe was available. Energy must have been created at some finite time in the past; otherwise we would have died long ago.

Interesting that this goes under the heading, The Universe is Stable. Depending on the answers to the problems raised in the previous article, the claims above may well be true. Hurray! But not for long…

The logical conclusion is that an infinite Creator made the universe a finite time ago.

Well, I dunno where the ‘infinite’ creator part comes from, and the whole sentence is a non-sequitur. That is to say, it’s not the logical conclusion. Assuming that the first part is correct and relevant (ie there is no way for energy or matter to enter the universe), we might well be able to say that the universe is of finite age. I’m no steady statesman, and they have their own ways around the problem. But to then say that we need a creator? Far too large a logical jump.

More Turtles on the Menu, Folks!

According to the Law of Conservation of Energy, and now the ICR, Energy Cannot Naturally Be Created Or Destroyed.

You’ll note that they differ from the usual phrase by the word ‘Naturally’. The author contends that the universe contains energy, and energy cannot be created, therefore God (or in this case, “our supernatural Creator”).

This is an interesting point, though more in where you go to answer it than any intrinsic value of it’s own. Leaving aside the whole turtles thing (What created God then? Oh, wait, you’re not supposed to ask that question. My bad), let’s look into it.

The Law of Conservation of Energy only works here by implying that the Universe is a closed, isolated system, where energy and matter cannot leave or enter. This sounds reasonable, but we don’t know that this is true. It might not be. So much for “the [only] logical conclusion”.

Then we have the question of how much energy there is in the universe. It isn’t infinite, it might even be nothing.

Considering we live in a time where we are just discovering dark matter and dark energy, and have not yet fully finished Big Bang theory, we are in no position to say anything concrete on this subject. You can’t prove it either way, at the moment. But it is too soon to jump to supernatural causes.

The Universe Was Created Recently, ish

Many clock-like processes operating in the solar system and beyond indicate that the universe is young. For example, spiral galaxies should not exist if they are billions of years old. The stars near their centers rotate around the galactic cores faster than stars at the perimeters. If a cosmology based on long ages is correct, they should have blended into disk-shaped galaxies by now.

“Spiral galaxies” aren’t in the solar system, but I’m sure I’ve already made worse mistakes. In any case, this is… odd. Unlike with the DpSU’s, there are no references in this article, so I can’t see where it’s coming from here. What makes a spiral galaxy not a disk galaxy also? If he is referring to the Galactic Bulge, this could be formed by cannibalism of other galaxies, and there are spiral galaxies without them. And the winding problem? There are answers, but the author hasn’t bothered to counter them in any way.

Comets pose a similar problem. They lose material each time they pass around the sun. Why would they still exist after vast eons?

There are thought to be billions of comets-in-waiting in the Oort cloud and in the nearer Kuiper Belt. Short period comets like Haley need not have gone round and around for all of the last few billion years.

Saturn’s rings still look new and shiny. And many planets and moons are very geologically active. Surely the energy they continually expend should have been spent long ago if they are as old as they are usually claimed to be.

The current material in Saturn’s rings is not all that old, coming from the break up of a moon. (Edit: or maybe not. Here’s a relevant blog post on the subject.). They are kept fresh by the constituent particles of ice bumping into each other and creating new, clean surfaces for light to reflect on. And I’ve already covered Io, which can be extended further. (As it happens, I’ve been alerted to the existence of a paper from nature on this subject, which very much suggests that the problem has been resolved, and not in favour of the creationists).

Instead, the more astronomers learn about the heavens, the more evidence there is that the universe is young.

Yeah, no… Try again.